Course Descriptions

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Course Descriptions by Semester

 

Summer 2016 Course Descriptions

 

Thoughtful Living:  An Introduction to the Ethical Thought of Aristotle (elective)
PH5200H/Y-E-CR/AU
Mr. Ryan Williams

This class will be a guided reading of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, a text from the ancient world that (arguably) has had the single greatest influence on Western morality next to the Bible.  We will also see, more specifically, that it serves as the underpinning of Catholic moral teaching as well.  By reading the Nicomachean Ethics, we will explore Aristotle’s understanding of the good life and discuss what his reflections tell us about ourselves, both as rational animals in the world, and as Christians destined for life with God.  Finally, in our study of Aristotle’s view of human life, we will come to appreciate one of the greatest minds in history, and learn why Dante gives him the title of “ the teacher of those who know.

Thinking Well:  An Introduction to Logic (elective)
PH7017H-E-CR/AU
Mr. Ryan Williams

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the conditions necessary for thinking well about the world.  It is divided into two parts: (1) in the first part we will learn about the syllogism, one of the basic components of human thinking discovered and described by Aristotle in the 4th century BC.  We will learn why it is that some statements must be true if others are true, and come to an appreciation of speech and thought in human life.  Students will learn how to recognize false reasoning, and how to craft syllogisms that are valid.  Once the students are familiar with these ideas, we will move to the second part of the class.  (2) In the second part we will be introduced into a more abstract kind of logic, in which the use of symbols allows us to look even more specifically and the relationship that grammar has to logical reasoning.  This will include learning about basic logical operators, like a conjunction, a disjunction, and conditional statements.   NO PREVIOUS TRAINING IN LOGIC IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE

Lay Ecclesial Ministry & the Church
MA5150H/Y-E-CR/AU
Dr. Donna Eschenauer

In 2005 the USCCB approved Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord: A Resource for Guiding the Development of Lay Ecclesial Ministry as a compliment to the Plan for Priestly Ministry and the National Directory for the Formation, Ministry, and Life of Permanent Deacons in the United States. This course will deepen the ongoing theological reflection set forth in this vital resource. It will explore its foundations, historical context, characteristics, spirituality, development and growth in light of contemporary pastoral practice.

Gospel of Mark
MA1710Y/H-E-CR/AU
Dr. Enrique Aguilar

"This course will study the gospel of Mark through the consideration of its literary characteristics, its historical setting, and its comparison with the other gospels, seeking to understand its own theology and its specific presentation of Christ. After presenting a discussion on general issues of the gospel (authorship, audience, date, plan, theology), an exegetical study of a selection of passages will be offered.”

Apologetics
MA2060Y/H-E-CR/AU
Fr. Kevin O’Reilly

Have you ever wished to have more persuasive answers to questions about your Catholic faith?  This course will present a systematic study of Apologetics, which aims to demonstrate the rational credibility of Christianity and which is needed today more than ever for building up the faith of believers and evangelizing non-believers.  First, the nature and history of Apologetics will be studied, along with the traditional methods to establish that it is reasonable to believe that the Christian faith is true.  In addition, the course will respond to the principle current objections to Christianity by providing arguments for the existence of God, the credibility of revelation, the historicity, miracles and resurrection of Jesus Christ and responses to the challenges of relativism, modern science, the problem of evil and religious pluralism.

Ecclesiology
MA2020Y/H-E-CR/AU
Mr. Kevin O’Reilly

This course examines the mystery of the Church – the people of God, a historical and communal reality brought about by the missions of the Son and the Holy Spirit. Students are expected to gain a proficient understanding of elements and terms of Catholic ecclesiology, to appreciate the biblical roots and traditional development of the Church’s origin, to become articulate in explaining her nature, structure and mission, to value both the unity and diversity in the Church, and to gain proper concern for the task of evangelization and ecumenism.

Introduction to Liturgy
MA5800P/Y/H-E-CR/AU
Fr. Matthew Ernest

This course will explore the theological, historical, and pastoral dimensions of the Sacred Liturgy. The history and liturgical theology of the Roman Rite, the role of ritual and symbol, the principles and norms articulated in the Second Vatican Council's Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, and the theology of the Liturgy of the Hours will be the foci of this course. 3 Credits (MA Theo, MAPS, MARS Requirement).

Teaching Gregorian Chant to Children
MA8200Y-D-CR/AU
Dr. Jennifer Donelson

This one-week intensive course will present pedagogical techniques for teaching Gregorian chant to children and is ideal for Catholic schoolteachers, directors and teachers of religious education, directors of children’s choirs, and parents. Special emphasis will be placed on the Ward Method, a comprehensive music education method designed to teach sacred music to children. Other topics addressed will include resources for teachers, other teaching approaches, and the logistics of developing a sacred music program for children.


 

 

Spring 2016 Course Descriptions

 

Catholic Theology and Interreligious Dialogue”

MA2082Y/H-E-CR/AU

Rev John P. O’Neill, I.V.D., Ph.D., D.Min., S.T.M.

Beginning with the Vatican II Document on interreligious dialogue, “Nostra Aetate,” and making ample use of additional Vatican and papal documents such as “Redemptoris Missio” and “Dominus Jesus,” this course will examine the uniqueness of Catholic Christianity as well as Jesus Christ as “Universal Savior” in light of other major religious traditions. It will explore some fundamental teachings of Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. In addition, it will examine the question of “religious pluralism” in light of Catholic teaching and will study some major issues and even conflicts in our contemporary society.

 

Sacramental Theology

MA 2450H-S-CR/AU

Fr. Nick Zientarski

This course will explore both general themes of Roman Catholic sacramental theology, such as causality, efficacy, and receptivity, as well as a thorough introduction to each of the seven sacraments: Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Reconciliation, Anointing of the Sick, Holy Orders, and Marriage. Students will learn about the historical development of the sacraments, the theology that undergirds each of the sacraments, the sacramental rituals/liturgies, and pastoral cases related to the New Evangelization.  

Christian Initiation (RCIA): Theology and Practice

MA 5110

Dr. Donna Eschenauer

This course will explore the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults from a historical, theological, liturgical, ecclesial, and pastoral dimension. Careful consideration will be given to sacramental theology, the language of the RCIA, the national statues for the celebration of the rite, the unbaptized, the baptized, children of catechetical age, and the baptized from other ecclesial communities. Attention will be given to evangelization, catechesis, the liturgical year, and the impact of the RCIA on the life of the Church.  


Introduction to Chant

MA8100Y-E-CR/AU

Dr. Jennifer Donelson

 

Serving as an introduction to Gregorian chant, this course will cover neumatic notation, Gregorian modes, ear training and sight reading, vocal technique appropriate for singing chant, and Latin pronunciation. Special focus will be placed on rhythmic interpretation of the chant according to the classical Solesmes (Mocquereau) method. By the end of the class, students will have confidence singing from the Graduale Romanum, solfège, and psalm tones, and some experience in conducting (chironomy). Additional topics introduced in the class include the history of Gregorian chant, rehearsal techniques for teaching chant to children and adult choirs, and an introduction to chant resources in English and Spanish.

Theology of the Eucharist

MD2500           

Fr. Michael Bruno, S.T.D.

The Second Vatican Council affirmed that the Eucharist is the “source and summit of Christian life” (LG 11). This course will examine the scriptural and systematic foundations of Eucharistic theology. We will examine significant biblical foundations, the Eucharistic theology of the Fathers, the Carolingian and early medieval debates, the Fourth Lateran Council, St. Thomas Aquinas and Scholastic insights, the Protestant Reformation and the Tridentine response, Vatican II and contemporary Eucharistic theology. We will also examine the Real Presence, Transubstantiation, the sacrificial and eschatological nature of the Eucharist, Eucharistic Adoration, and the relationship of Eucharist to Holy Orders and to the Church.

The Church in the Modern World

MD4531

Fr. Michael Bruno, S.T.D.

This course will examine the Church in the “Modern” era, and its encounter with a changing social, political, philosophical, and even geographical landscape. We will survey the history of the Church from the 17th century to the Second Vatican Council, examine important sources, and draw important theological connections. Important themes will include the Church in the 17th Century, Jansenism, the French Revolution, Vatican Council I, Modernism, and Vatican Council II.


 

Summer 2015 Course Descriptions

 

MA 2020Y Ecclesiology – Fr. Kevin O’Reilly

This course presents a systematic study of the Mystery of the Church; scriptural foundations and historical developments; the Church as Mystery and Universal Sacrament of Salvation; the Church as One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic; the Church as Communion; Missiology and Evangelization; Indefectibility and the Holiness of the Church; Apostolic Succession and Petrine Primacy; the Magisterium, Infallibility and the Relationship between the Teaching Office of the Church and Theologians; the Marian Mystery of the Church.

Required Text:

The Splendor of the Church, by Henri DeLubac

Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles

MA 1371Y

Fr. William Cleary

This course will explore the “double work” of the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles. Although they will be treated sequentially, their unity of vision and common Lucan themes will be emphasized. The Gospel of Luke presents the historical significance of Christ, and highlights the completion of God’s merciful plan in Him. Acts traces the history of the Church and the spread of the Gospel through the activity of the apostles guided by the Holy Spirit. Suggestions for pastoral application will be drawn from these studies.

Required Text:

Johnson, LT. The Gospel of Luke. Sacra Pagina 3. Collegeville, MN: Michael Glazier

Kurz, William. Acts of the Apostles. CCSS. GRand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2013.

Introduction to Church History

MA 4000Y

Msgr. Peter Vaccari

 

This course will serve as an introduction and overview to the study of the Church in history. Following a presentation of the methods of the discipline, the course will survey the major moments in the history of the Church from the apostolic age to the present. The course will include the development of the Church’s relationship with the world, the history of the papacy, the development of conciliar history, popular devotion, the life of the Church in various regions of the world, the lives of the saints, and the internal

struggles of ecclesial life.

Required Text:

The Catholic Church Through the Ages, by John Vidmar, OP Paulist Press NY/Mahwah, N.J. 2005

Theology of Grace

MA 1350Y

Fr. Kevin O’Reilly

This course will study the history of the Christian concept of grace. It will begin with an examination of the nature of grace as found in Scripture and then consider the theology of grace in the early Western and Eastern Fathers, especially St. Augustine; the Medieval Scholastics, especially St. Thomas; and the Reformation, including a consideration of Luther’s position. The course will conclude with an examination of a contemporary view of grace.

Required Text: The Meaning of Grace, by Charles Journet

Sexual & Medical Ethics in the Catholic Moral Tradition

MA 3241H

Fr. Charles Caccavale

 

The course will explore contemporary moral issues faced by individuals, families, and the wider social context. Positions taken by the Catholic Church on various issues in the field of human sexuality and health care ethics will be examined with the goal of articulating Church teaching in a meaningful way for contemporary society. This will be accomplished by providing the theological foundation for that teaching and through discussion of particular moral issues. The course will examine such questions as the meaning of human sexuality by which behaviors of a sexual nature can be morally evaluated, beginning and end of life issues, as well as other issues in the field of medicine and health care.

Required texts:

Lawler, Ronald, Boyle, Joseph, and May, William. Catholic Sexual Ethics, A

Summary, Explanation, and Defense, 3nd edition.  Huntington, IN: Our Sunday Visitor, Inc., 2011

Ashley, Benedict and O’Rourke, Kevin. Ethics of Health Care: An Introductory

Textbook (3rd edition).  Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2002.

 

Introduction to Chant: Theory & Practicum

MA 8100Y

Dr. Jennifer Donelson

July 13,14,15,16,17,18; 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

 

Special Offer for Students enrolled in the St. Cecilia Academy - Tuition - $700.00

Serving as an introduction to Gregorian chant, this course will cover neumatic notation, Gregorian modes, ear training and sight reading, vocal technique appropriate for singing chant, and Latin pronunciation. Special focus will be placed on rhythmic interpretation of the chant according to the classical Solesmes (Mocquereau) method. By the end of the one-week class, students will have confidence with solfege, singing chants and psalm tones, and some experience in basic conducting (chironomy). Special side-topics to be touched upon in the class include a basic understanding of the history of Gregorian chant, rehearsal techniques for teaching chant to children and adult choirs, as well as an introduction to chant resources in English and Spanish.

Required Text: Textbook of Gregorian Chant According to the Solesmes Method by Dom Gregory Suñol and G.M. Durnford. The textbook is available for purchase here: http://www.lulu.com/shop/dom-gregory-sunol-and-gm-durnford/textbook-of-gregorian-chant-according-to-the-solesmes-method/paperback/product-909863.html; or free PDF download here: http://media.musicasacra.com/pdf/sunol.pdf

WORKSHOPS

WK 106H Capital Vices – Mr. Ryan Williams

May 19,21,26,28; 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Tuition: Credit - $467.00, Audit - $150.00

 

The Seven Deadly Sins:  What they are; What they do; and how to avoid them.

In this workshop we will look at St. Thomas Aquinas’ articulations of the 7 deadly sins, also called the Capital Vices.  St. Thomas does not treat of vice in a systematic way, but rather indicates each vice in the context of a life of virtue.  This workshop will look at each of these sections, seemingly disjointed throughout his works, as a single unit and learn the common thread that runs through the most potent sins.

WK 107Y Celebrating Liturgy with Children – Dr. Donna Eschenauer

June 22 through June 25; 1:30 PM to 4:30 PM

Tuition: Credit - $467.00, Audit - $150.00

 

Developmentally, children experience a profound sense of identity in and through the ritual prayer of the Church. This workshop will explore various parish liturgies celebrated with children, for example, Sunday Mass with Families, Weekday Mass with School Children, The Liturgy of the Word with Children, First Communion, and First Penance. Of special consideration for this workshop is the influence of the Directory for Masses With Children that influences appropriate ways to implement adaptation. Ultimately, careful attention to contemporary practice raises question about how we nurture children in the liturgical life of the church.

Required Texts:The Directory for Masses With Children. Sacred Congregation for Divine Worship, 1973.

Donne M. Eschenauer. First Communion Liturgies: Preparing First Class First Sacraments. Liturgical Press, 2014.

Pat Fosarelli, Donna Eschenauer, Paul Turner. How to Lead Children’s Liturgy of the Word. Liturgy Training Publications, 2014.

WK 108Y Faith & Belief in the 21st Century (1 CR option) – Mr. David Bonagura, Jr.

Jun 1,2,8,9; 1:30 PM to 4:30 PM

Tuition: Credit - $467.00, Audit - $150.00  

Course Description: This workshop will consider the nature of faith and belief in light of challenges raised by contemporary secularism. After examining secular attitudes toward faith, including religious indifference and hostility to religion, faith itself will be explored in light of Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. Today's most pressing issues concerning faith will then be surveyed, including the credibility and certitude of faith, the relationship of faith and reason, the role of emotion and experience within the life of faith, the specter of doubt, and freedom in the acceptance of faith.

Required Text:

Avery Dulles, The Assurance of Things Hoped For: A Theology of Christian Faith (Oxford University Press, 1994).

 

 

Fall 2014 Course Descriptions

Fundamental Moral Theology

MA 3600Y

Fr. Thomas Berg, Ph.D.                                              

This course introduces the field of Catholic Moral Theology by examining its fundamental elements and principles as they are found in the Scriptures, the teachings of the Church, and the thought and work of Catholic theologians. Topics include the historical development of Catholic Moral Theology, an investigation into moral subjects, and the sources of moral wisdom. In addition, it briefly explores some contemporary moral issues in the area of human sexuality, health care, and Catholic social teaching.

3 Credits  (MATheo, MAPS, MARS Requirement)   

 


 

Theology of the Body  

MA 3780Y

Fr. Charles Caccavale, S.T.D.      

 

One of the many contributions of John Paul II to the contemporary Church was his teachings in the area of human sexuality.  Through a series of catechetical talks, originally given as part of the Wednesday morning Papal Audiences, John Paul addressed at length and in depth the reality of human sexuality.  Now known as the Theology of the Body, his talks offer a theological reflection on sexuality that draws heavily on the biblical witness of the meaning of human life and our relationship with God.  This course, through reading, analysis, and discussion of the original text of John Paul II, will explore the main concepts that comprise this theology of the body with a view towards their application to contemporary Catholic sexual morality.  

3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS, MARS Elective) 

 

Trinity

MA 2070Y

Fr. Kevin O’Reilly, S.T.D.

 

This course will treat the central mystery of Christian faith and life: the Triune God.  It will examine how the one living and true God has revealed Himself as Father, Son and Holy Spirit in salvation history, with particular emphasis on Sacred Scripture. Thereafter, the course will study how the revelation of God as one and three was understood and  presented by patristic, medieval and modern theologians and the magisterium of the Church.  Finally, students will learn the centrality of the Trinity for all Christian theology and spirituality and how communion with the Triune God is the end and fulfillment of the human person.

3 Credits (MATheo Requirement; MAPS, MARS Elective).

 

Introduction to Liturgy

MA 5800Y

Fr. Matthew Ernest, S.T.D

 

This course will explore the theological, historical, and pastoral dimensions of the Sacred Liturgy.  The history and liturgical theology of the Roman Rite, the role of ritual and symbol, the principles and norms articulated in the Second Vatican Council's Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, and the theology of the Liturgy of the Hours will be the foci of this course.

3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS, MARS Requirement)

Introduction to Theology

 MA 2000Y                                                                 

Fr. John O’Neill, Ph.D., D.Min.

 

After a review of methodology, this course discusses the meaning, structure, and content of revelation in Catholic Theology, paying particular attention to scripture and tradition. The Church’s central doctrines will be explored, using the documents of Vatican II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church. This course will focus on the Church’s creeds and the development of doctrine, especially dealing with Trinitarian and Christological controversies.

3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS, MARS Requirement)

 

 

 

Introduction to Church History 

MA 4000Y

Fr. Michael Bruno, S.T.D

 

This course traces the development of major themes in Christian thought in order to examine the meaning of tradition and the developments of doctrine. In addition to the course lectures, an extended required bibliography familiarizes students with important primary as well as secondary sources. 

3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS Requirement; MARS Elective)

Introduction to Old Testament (Linked Course)

MA 1500Y

Fr. William Cleary, S.T.D.

 

This course offers a theological introduction to each of the books of the Old Testament according to the traditional tripartite division of Torah, Prophets, and Writings. Topics include the Catholic approach to the Old Testament, the history of Israel and the covenants, and the ongoing relevance of the Old Testament for Christianity. 3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS Requirement, MARS Elective)

 

The Passion Narratives

MA 1375Y

Fr. Timothy Scannell, Ph.D.

 

Each of the Passion Narratives communicates a unique message and addresses different concerns regarding the saving death of Jesus.  This course will examine the special perspective and insights each evangelist offers about the suffering and Death of Jesus so that we might appreciate better its meaning for our lives.

3 Credits (MA Theo, MAPS, MARS, Post-MA-Sacred Scripture Elective)

Latin I 

MA 6165Y

Mr. David Bonagura, M.A.

The first course is an introduction to Latin with examples and exercises drawn from liturgical, biblical, and other ecclesiastical sources

3 Credits (MATheo, Post MA-Dogmatic Theo. Requirement: MAPS, MARS Elective)  

     

       

Huntington Campus Courses

 

Fundamental Moral Theology

MA 3600Y

Fr. Thomas Berg, Ph.D.

This course introduces the field of Catholic Moral Theology by examining its fundamental elements and principles as they are found in the Scriptures, the teachings of the Church, and the thought and work of Catholic theologians. Topics include the historical development of Catholic Moral Theology, an investigation into moral subjects, and the sources of moral wisdom. In addition, it briefly explores some contemporary moral issues in the area of human sexuality, health care, and Catholic social teaching.

3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS, MARS Requirement) 

 

Introduction to Theology

MA2000H

Msgr. Robert Batule, S.T.L.

 

This course treats the nature, sources, and method of theology, both as a science and as an on-going process. It gives particular emphasis to the Christian and Catholic concept of the theological endeavor. After treating the basic principles and sources of theology, such as faith, revelation, Sacred Scripture, Tradition and Magisterium, it seeks to illustrate the nature and methods of “doing theology” by carefully unfolding several dimensions of a Biblical Christology. In this context, it deals with the unity and the distinctness of the Christologies of the four Gospels, the question of the “historical Jesus,” and the questions of the life, ministry, preaching, and miracles of Jesus.

3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS Requirement) 

 

Summative Seminar

MA9502H

Mr. Ryan Williams, Ph.D., (cand)

 

In this seminar, several books of theological importance will be discussed in terms of their relationship to one another and to the student’s previous course work. In connection with this seminar, a major paper is to be written which demonstrates the students’ personal integration of their theological studies with ministerial concerns.

 Fall Semester Only - Fulfills Summative Requirement for the Master of Arts in Theology. Enrollment is Limited 

 

Trinity

MA 2070Y

Fr. Kevin O’Reilly, S.T.D.

 

This course will treat the central mystery of Christian faith and life: the Triune God.  It will examine how the one living and true God has revealed Himself as Father, Son and Holy Spirit in salvation history, with particular emphasis on Sacred Scripture. Thereafter, the course will study how the revelation of God as one and three was understood and  presented by the tradition and  magisterium of the Church and in the writings of patristic, medieval and modern theologians.  Finally, students will learn the centrality of the Trinity for all Christian theology and spirituality and how communion with the Triune God is the end and fulfillment of the human person.

3 Credits (MATheo Requirement; MAPS, MARS Elective)

 Introduction to Liturgy

MA 5800Y

Fr. Matthew Ernest, S.T.D.

 

This course will explore the theological, historical, and pastoral dimensions of the Sacred Liturgy.  The history and liturgical theology of the Roman Rite, the role of ritual and symbol, the principles and norms articulated in the Second Vatican Council's Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, and the theology of the Liturgy of the Hours will be the foci of this course. 3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS, MARS Requirement) 

 

 

 

Biblical Greek

 MA7050H

Dr. Alexander Burke, Ph.D.

 

This course provides the student with sufficient knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary to enable him or her to read the Greek New Testament with the aid of a dictionary and a grammatical analysis. It gives the beginner an intensive introduction to New Testament Greek through a systematic study with extensive readings in the Gospel of John. In addition to an orderly training of the mind, the student learns to read the Word of God in the human language, Koiné Greek, in which God and the writers of the New Testament chose to convey to us His Word.3 credits (Post-MA Certif. Sacred Scripture Requirement; MATheo, MACPS: Fulfills Language Requirement)

 

Introduction to Old Testament (Linked)

MA1500H

Fr. William Cleary, S.T.D

 

This course offers a theological introduction to each of the books of the Old Testament according to the traditional tripartite division of Torah, Prophets, and Writings. Topics include the Catholic approach to the Old Testament, the history of Israel and the covenants, and the ongoing relevance of the Old Testament for Christianity. 3 Credits(MATheo, MAPS Requirement) 

 

Made for Another World: The Heavenward Teachings of C.S. Lewis

MA7313H

Ms. Annabelle Moseley, M.F.A., M.A

 

"If I find in myself desires which nothing in this world can satisfy, the only logical explanation is that I was made for another world." - C.S. Lewis

How well the classic works of C.S. Lewis affirm the innate truth within us that we are made for another world! In this course, we will learn what made Lewis, a former atheist, one of the 20th century's greatest apologists for Christianity and how some of his best and most varied works have one transformative and unifying theme: bringing the reader beyond the pleasures and sufferings of this world and pointing to the next. The oeuvre of Lewis is unique in its melding of well-reasoned argument with creative evocations of wonder and awe. Works that will be covered include Surprised by Joy, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain, and Of Other Worlds. 3 Credits (MATheo, MAPS Elective)

 

Huntington Saturday Classes

 

Introduction to Old Testament

MA 1500H

Msgr. Richard Henning, S.T.D

 

This course offers an introduction to the writings of the Old Testament and their historical, literary, and theological     contexts. It aims to acquaint students with the basic categories of the Old Testament writings, with contemporary     methods of studying them and with their role in Christian faith and practice today. 3 Credits (Aspirant) (MATheo, MAPS Requirement).

 

Introduction to Church History

MA 4000H

Dr. Daniel Frascella, Ph.D. This course traces the development of major themes in Christian thought in order to examine the meaning of tradition and the developments of doctrine. In addition to the course lectures, an extended required bibliography familiarizes students with important primary as well as secondary sources. 3 Credits (Candidacy I) (MATheo, MAPS Requirement)

Pauline Literature

MP 1030H

Dr. Alexander Burke, Ph.D.

Each of the thirteen epistles associated with Paul is read and critiqued in this course in conjunction with discussion of Paul’s life and issues of authorship and epistolary genre. Particular emphasis is given to the character of the Pauline communities and ways in which the epistles respond to their individual needs. The contribution of rhetorical criticism to Pauline studies is also considered.

3 Credits   (Candidacy II) (MATheo, MAPS Elective)

 

Introduction to Theology 

MA 2000H

Dr. Michael Hoonhout, Ph.D. This course treats the nature, sources, and method of Catholic theology, both as a science and as an on-going process. It gives particular emphasis to the Christian and Catholic concept of the theological endeavor by treating the basic principles and sources of theology, such as faith, revelation, Sacred Scripture, Tradition and Magisterium.

3 Credits (Aspirant/Candidacy I) (MATheo, MAPS Requirement).

 

Homiletics

MP 5200H

Fr. Gregory Rannazzisi, S.T.L.

 

This course examines the theological, biblical and liturgical roots of preaching. The design and delivery of the homily will be discussed. Lectures, preaching, and critical evaluation of homilies will comprise the sessions. Special attention will be given to preaching at Mass, vigil  and funeral services, and Batisms. 3 Credits (Candidacy II) (MATheo, MAPS Elective)

 Douglaston Campus Courses

Metaphysic

PH 5800D

Fr. Joseph Koterski, Ph.D.

 

This course presents an in-depth analysis of metaphysics: the investigation concerning ultimate principles of knowing and being. Central metaphysical topics presented are: the question of existence, the human soul, the mind/body relationship, dualism, the problem of God, as well as time and space. This course will also take a historical evaluation of the development of metaphysical thought from the pre-Socratics up to contemporary ideas. 3 Credits (MACPS Requirement)

 


 

History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

PH 5500D

Mr. Mario Cardone, Ph.D. (cand.)

 

This course is a study of philosophy since 1800. Movements and principal figures examined and discussed: German Idealism (Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, and Schopenhauer), Existentialism (Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre), Pragmatism (Peirce, James, Dewey), Phenomenology (Husserl, Scheler, Stein), Positivism and Analytic Philosophy (Comte, Wittgenstein, Russell, Popper), and Post-Modern Philosophy (Rorty, Derrida, Foucault). 3 Credits (MACPS Requirement)

 

Biblical Greek I 

PH 1060D

Msgr. Robert Thelen, S.T.L.

 

This course provides the student with sufficient knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary to enable him or her to read the Greek New Testament with the aid of a dictionary and a grammatical analysis. It gives the beginner an intensive introduction to New Testament Greek through a systematic study with extensive readings in the Gospel of John. In addition to an orderly training of the mind, the student learns to read the Word of God in the human language, Koiné Greek, in which God and the writers of the New Testament chose to convey to us His Word. 3 credits (MACPS, Post MA-Sacred Scripture Requirement; Fulfills MATheo Language Requirement)

 

Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas

PH 7200D

Fr. Christopher Cullen, S.J

 

This course will be an introduction to the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas.  It will range across issues raised by the saint in metaphysics, anthropology, and epistemology.  Its primary focus will be those topics that lend themselves to the study of Catholic theology and will highlight especially the philosophical distinctions that are necessary for a consistent articulation of the faith. 3 Credits (MACPS Requirement, MATheo Elective)

Latin I

PH 6164D

Dr. Walter Petrovitz, Ph.D.

 

The first course is an introduction to Latin with examples and exercises drawn from liturgical, biblical, and other ecclesiastical sources 3 Credits  (MACPS, MATheo, Post MA-Dogmatic Theo Requirement; MAPS, MARS Elective)

 

Contact Us

St. Joseph's Seminary
St. Joseph's Seminary
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Yonkers, NY 10704
P: (914) 968-6200
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